Posts by Stephen Holmes

3D printed ‘fur’ tiles

Published 28 May 2012

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: 3d printing, london, cillia, clerkenwell, bread

Sadly, our plans to visit Clerkenwell Design Week were scuppered by deadlines, although acquaintances that made it felt we should show you this: BREAD‘s laser sintered fibre tiles.

The project began as a commissioned investigation into the possibilities of design collective BREAD’s material research for application in interior surfaces. The resulting Cilia is a set of stroke-ably soft, selectively laser sintered surface tiles made up of tens of thousands of nylon fibres.

“Through the use of digital modelling and Netfabb’s Selective Space Structures software every element of geometry can be controlled and tweaked to the designer’s intent. Allowing control over each tile in terms of visual impact and feel,” states a release from BREAD.

“Cilia challenges our notions of not only the geometric but material possibilities of additive layer manufacturing and shows how the combination of modern modelling and manufacturing allows us to control these elements with an unprecedented level of detail that traditional processes cannot match.”

bread.uk.com

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Customisation key in 3D Systems’ latest acquisition

Published 25 May 2012

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: 3d printing, industrial design, manufacture, 3d systems, medical, bespoke innovations, prosthetics

The arrival of summer has not seen 3D Systems let up in its spending spree - having announced its latest acquisition: Bespoke Innovations, a San Francisco start-up that 3D prints custom fit prosthetics.

Bespoke develops proprietary, integrated scan, design and print technology that is designed to deliver custom fit prosthetics, orthotics and orthopedic devices that improve treatment and look pretty impressive too.

3D Systems plans to integrate Bespoke into its growing healthcare solutions services and commercialise a full range of innovative, ventilated and lightweight custom fit prosthetics.

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3D Systems expands its online print choices to include ZPrinter and ProJet materials

Published 25 May 2012

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: zcorp, online, clarks, zprinter, 3dsystems, 3dprinting

3D Systems has announced the immediate availability of ZPrinter and ProJet 3D printed parts to its online On Demand Parts services.

Having been sprinting around acquiring new companies and processes, it’s nice to see 3D Systems making them available through its online parts service.

ZPrinter, the technology from the ZCorp acquisition last year, creates defined features in full color, ideal for design concepts in a nearly finished state. Meanwhile, ProJet offers precise, durable high definition parts with fine feature details, with resolution as fine as 30–40 microns with 16 micron layers.

“We have always sought to serve the needs of our customers and to provide the product development community with the latest materials, innovation and technology available,” honked Patrick Hunter, vice president and general manager of 3D Systems’ On Demand Parts service.

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Prime Cuts: A legendary open top - the 1966 Shelby Cobra 427 Super Snake

Published 24 May 2012

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: automotive, prime cuts, ford, cobra, shelby

As Britain experiences a minor heatwave this week, the country that buys more convertible cars per person than any other will be dreaming of taking to the open road with the hood down.

Sadly, Carroll Shelby, the designer of one of the most brilliant topless beauties passed away this month, so we’d like to remember his contribution to automotive legend by posting this as our Prime Cuts choice - the 1966 Shelby Cobra 427 Super Snake.

One of only two built (the other was driven off a cliff), the former ride of Bill Cosby sold for $5.5 million in 2007. Using lightweight British AC Ace bodies, he strapped two superchargers to a Ford V-8 engine to develop an 800hp sledgehammer that looked and sounded amazing - not a bad legacy to leave behind.

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Leap Motion: $70 hand gesture controller 200x more precise than a Kinect

Published 24 May 2012

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: industrial design, visualise, leap, controller

This little white box is the device you’ve been dreaming of since watching the swooshy-hand-gesturing of films like Minority Reports and Iron Man - a device that truly relays hand gestures.

The Leap Motion is claimed to be 200 times more precise than the Microsoft Kinect, distinguishing individual fingers and tracking user movements down to a 1/100th of a millimetre, and simply plugs into your USB.2.0 port, and at $70, it seems like a great additional tool for showing off 3D models on screen, or even going the whole hog and designing a part with it.

“Leap represents an entirely new way to interact with your computer,” explains the blurb from Leap’s website. “It’s more accurate than a mouse, as reliable as a keyboard and more sensitive than a touchscreen. For the first time, you can control a computer in three dimensions with your natural hand and finger movements.”

live.leapmotion.com

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UK copyright law extended to ‘life of the creator plus 70 years’

Published 23 May 2012

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: design council, intellectual property, copyright, deign, con ran

Changes as part of the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill, announced today by the Government, will in practice means that owners of any copyrights in classic designs will be able to use copyright law to prevent the sale of unauthorised copies of such designs.

The repeal of section 52 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, which currently restricts copyright to 25 years on artistic works that are exploited through an industrial process, means that designs that qualify for copyright protection is to be enforceable to a term of ‘life of the creator plus 70 years’.

Legendary British design figure Sir Terence Conran has welcomed the changes, saying: “By protecting new designs more generously, we are encouraging more investment of time and talent in British design. That will lead to more manufacturing in Britain, and that in turn will lead to more jobs – which we desperately need right now.

“Properly protected design can help make the UK a profitable workshop again. We have the creative talent – let’s use it.”

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Job of the week: Design Engineer - Rotaflow - Derbyshire

Published 23 May 2012

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: job of the week, job, rotaflow

Design Engineer - Rotaflow

Job Type: Permanent
Software: SolidWorks
Location: Whaley Bridge, Derbyshire

This week’s job involves the design and preparation of models and drawings for pressurised containing pipework for the oil, nuclear, food and other industries at expert firm Rotaflow.

Experience with this type of work would be beneficial, and there are opportunities for progression into hands on R&D work, FEA modelling, quality control or sales support.

Sound like the job for you? Apply here


If you have a vacancy that you are wanting to fill, get in touch here

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