Posts by Stephen Holmes

DEVELOP3D Live Keynote: Daniel Simon

Published 06 March 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: rendering, prototype, industrial design, visualisation, automotive, develop3d live, d3dlive, viz, sfx, daniel simon

Daniel Simon’s concept for the Lotus C-01 motorcycle

With DEVELOP3D LIVE only six weeks away, today we’re announcing our amazing headline speaker:

This year’s keynote is Daniel Simon, one of the most in demand concept designers in the world today, who has designed for clients including Bugatti, Lotus and Volkswagen, as well as concept vehicles for Hollywood blockbusters such as Tron: Legacy, Captain America, Prometheus and Oblivion.

DEVELOP3D LIVE returns to Warwick on April 15 with a whole host of exciting new speakers plus an expanded exhibition - Tickets for all four conference streams are FREE, but you must be registered to attend.

Daniel Simon alongside the Bubbleship he designed for the film Oblivion, starring Tom Cruise

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Protomold announce new Liquid Silicone Rubber injection moulding service

Published 05 March 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: manufacturing, proto labs, protomold, lsr, silicone

Protomold has announced its new Liquid Silicone Rubber (LSR) injection moulding service, a versatile material for use in an abundance of industries.

The company specialises in fast turnaround, and the LSR service is no different to its standard thermoplastic capabilities.

Even though LSR is a thermosetting, two-component mixture, cooled before being injected into a heated mould and vulcanised to produce the final moulded part [which we all knew…], cured using a platinum catalyst, with a permanent moulded condition [naturally…] Protomold can produce just 25, to more than 5,000 parts, that can be delivered in no more than three weeks.

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Prepping for DEVELOP3D Live - 6 weeks to go! We visit Berlin + PI Congress

Published 04 March 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: develop3d live, conference, exhibition, berlin, d3d live, pi congress

Last week things were a bit quiet on the DEVELOP3D.com front, primarily as we’re beavering away on the H U G E March edition of the magazine (40 page 3D printing for professionals supplement included) or our show - DEVELOP3D Live.

Seeing as we like our show to be a live incarnation of everything we publish, mutter about in the pub, or write on the ‘Shit To Be Doing’ whiteboard, we like to get out and about, visiting as many different conferences as possible - so I was bussed off to Berlin (with a packed lunch, an emergency pie and my name sewn into the collar of my shirt) to visit the classy PI Congress conference.

It’s a bit fancy, being held in a very fancy hotel that usually serves as home-from-home for the German military top brass and has more chandeliers than I’d know which to swing from - and it’s full of ‘suits’ generally there to learn about the latest PLM software.

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Global contenders chase £1m prize in the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

Published 03 March 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: engineering, queen elizabeth prize for engineering, corgis, qeprize, internet, fluffy dogs

The Queen, gawd bless ‘er, loves her Corgis - a rare breed of small, hardworking, occasionally nippy little buggers, with origins in ancient times - which is probably why she has such affinity for engineers.

As as result, with the backing of the Royal Academy of Engineering, Her Madge has once again put her name to The Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering (QEPrize), a global £1 million engineering prize that rewards and celebrates the engineers responsible for a ground-breaking innovation in engineering that has been of global benefit to humanity.

Its objective is simple: to raise the public profile of engineering and to inspire young people to become engineers, a noteworthy cause that DEVELOP3D is equally behind.

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Would Stradivari have gone Open Source? - 3D print your own violin

Published 20 February 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: design, 3d printing, autodesk, product design, makerbot, fdm, open source, fusion 360, sketching

A fiddle for all?

Last month our eye was caught by a violin moulded from perspex, and as impressive a feat at this is, a 3D printed fiddle has since captured our imagination.

David Perry and his open source cohorts have been fine tuning their F-F-Fiddle (FFF = fused filament fabrication, or FDM) allowing anyone with access to a 3D printer to build their own instrument.

Having begun as a collaboration with his friend and industrial designer Dan Nicholson, having bought a 3D printer after visiting a New York Maker Faire, the project is now on its sixth iteration.

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Hipsters x Pizza = Fixie pizza cutter

Published 19 February 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: bikes, pizza, hipsters

What do hipsters love? Fixie bikes, and loitering around at ‘Tech Start-up Events’ waiting for the free pizza and beer - they love ‘em!

Preying upon this weakness, DOIY Design has created the fixie wheel pizza cutter.

Expect gasps of awe from the scrounging, pretentious, moustachioed-wanker-freeloaders when you whip this out at a tech meet-up. Then hoof the lot of them out and get back to business.

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Brick battle: LEGO looking to replace ABS material for sustainable alternative

Published 19 February 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: sustainability, manufacturing, lego, materials, eco, abs, plastic, bricks

An iconic toy and tool for almost every product designer, LEGO is facing a materials conundrum in its quest to become more sustainable.

As the Danish company strives to increase its eco credentials before 2030, it faces a design and manufacturing issue kicking its annual 4,200 ton ABS habit - finding a material that gives the standard LEGO ‘clutch’ without warping over time; that will seamlessly fits with all its existing products, and which meets the standards written within 3,082 pages worth of legislation for toys.

Lego has to carefully track colour controls, so that a brick moulded today will exactly match one from its past or from the future, yet this could be in jeopardy if the machinery being used to pump out the blocks of joy has to be replaced to work with a new resin (it would also be rather pricey).

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