Weekender // Guy in a tank on the telly

Published 17 November 2017

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: engineering, weekender, jcb, tanks, guy martin

A five-month project to resurrect a World War One British Mark IV tank is interesting enough, but throw in motorcycle racer and truck mechanic Guy Martin, and his genuine affliction for design and engineering elevates any programme.

Much of the work was performed by JCB for the authentic reproduction of the 30-tonne tank, built from scratch, the process began with CAD data drawn up by a hobbyist modeller, before JCB designers upgraded the model and used cutting-edge manufacturing techniques to recreate the chassis of the historic machine in just 8 weeks.

The completed chassis was transported to Norfolk tank museum, near Norwich, where the remainder of the project took place.

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STEM Returners programme looks to help those restarting their careers

Published 17 November 2017

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: engineering, jobs, education, stem

Helping STEM qualified people close their CV gap and get back into work

A CV gap, for whatever reason, is often an insurmountable barrier to recruitment, often viewed negatively by both employers and returners, yet a new scheme aims to help all candidates with a STEM background find a way back into work. 

Through a supported return to work scheme STEM Returners will also support those candidates who are interested in transferring to a different sector, but lack the relevant experience to apply through traditional recruitment channels.

Both the returners and employers will be fully supported throughout the programme which includes confidence training and coaching for the returner, a 13 week fully supported paid internship and a diverse and evolved mentoring scheme.

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HP opens up on future plans, including a new sub $100k 3D printer and importance of the Build Unit

Published 17 November 2017

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: hardware, 3d printing, manufacturing, hp, materials, metals

For the production printers, the future of its productivity might lie in the hands of the build unit

While much of HPs news from Formnext was already out in the open a week before, a few little snippets came to light on the show floor.

Most interestingly was the news that a smaller MultiJet Fusion printer, priced under $100,000 will be revealed in 2018 to target the functional prototyping market, and no doubt to push the adoption of the bigger manufacturing class machines as a result.

Secondly was a more immediate look into the existing machines, and the 4210 upgrade, which sees software upgrades, as well as hardware changes to the processing station and a few of the printer’s components - yet as the materials progress the biggest changes will come to the interchangeable powdbed build units.

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New materials partnerships are rife at Formnext as vendors tie-up suppliers

Published 16 November 2017

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: 3d printing, manufacturing, hp, manufacture, materials, additive manufacturing

3D printing materials are key to advancing the processes and applications of the technology - these microscopic spherical materials from Dressler are set to aid the HP MultiJet Fusion technology

As important as the abilities of the machines themselves, the materials needed for 3D printing are a critical consumable, and one which the machine manufacturers were keen to tie-up partnerships for with suppliers.

While when compared to mature manufacturing processes like Metal Injection Moulding (MIM) demand is comparably low for 3D printing, but what 2017 has shown is that both vendors and materials suppliers are jostling for placement before the boom comes.

Metals powders proved most noticeable, as the sector for SLS metals 3D printing truly grew in the maturity and size of machines available, although plastics suppliers have also noticeably stepped up.

Below is a list of some of the key announcements from Formnext 2017:

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XJet’s Carmel 3D printer is ready for industry, multi-material metal and ceramic parts not far away

Published 16 November 2017

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: 3d printing, manufacturing, materials, additive manufacturing, xjet

The first of XJet’s nano-particle jetting 3D printers is already in a production setting with many more set to follow, as the Israeli company ramps up the production of its Carmel 1400 and 700 systems.

It’s an exciting technology, which it is hoped will soon make multi-material printing of metals and ceramic in the same part a possibility on an industrial scale.

Featuring the company’s patented NanoParticle Jetting (NPJ) technology, the printer eschews the costs and safety problems of 3D printing with powders and instead suspends the metal or ceramic particles in a solution, before layering them and a support material from high-resolution print heads.

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SLM Solutions 3D printing outlook continues to boom after turning down GE’s advances

Published 16 November 2017

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: engineering, 3d printing, manufacturing, additive manufacturing, china, slm solutions

An envisioned set-up of multiple SLM Solutions SLM 800 3D printers for mass production

While GE Additive made a big splash at 3D printing trade show Formnext, unveiling a first look at its additive manufacturing future, SLM Solutions, which turned down a reported $745M takeover from GE, was showing further evidence as to why it was set on going it alone.

On the first day of the event the German company picked up an order from an Asian energy firm for ‘at least €37M’ for 20 SLM 800 3D printers, following on from a similar order in recent months.

While we don’t usually post comment on such machine sales, it offers an interesting look at the expanded growth of an industry and the confidence within the sector - and the knock on effect this adoption will have for design and engineering tools.

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Renishaw partners with Identify3D to add security and traceability to additive manufacturing

Published 16 November 2017

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: engineering, design, manufacturing, siemens, additive manufacturing, renishaw, ip, identify3d

Identify3D will provide data protection and enforce production rules

Renishaw aims to offer an end-to-end, secure digital manufacturing process through a new collaboration with digital supply chain software company Identify3D.

SanFrancisco-based Identify3D will provide data protection coupled with contractual and manufacturing licensing from design to production on Renishaw AM systems.

According to Renishaw, by choosing to secure all digital data in the engineering phase, the technology enables users of its systems to protect their digital intellectual property, enforce production rules and provide traceability in the digital supply chain at the industry’s highest standard.

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