Dell embraces Haswell-EP Xeon E5 CPUs with new Precision workstations

Published 12 August 2014

Posted by Greg Corke

Article tagged with: cad, workstation, dell precision, remote workstation

In addition to launching new workstations, Dell has also extended the reach of its Dell Precision Performance Optimizer (DPPO) software to tune its machines for 3ds Max and Inventor

Dell has released three new Haswell-EP Xeon E5 desktop workstations: the single CPU Precision T5810 and dual CPU Precision T7810 and T7910.

The big news is what’s inside – two important new workstation components: Intel’s Haswell-based Xeon CPU (plus 2,133MHz DDR4 memory) and new GPUs from AMD FirePro and Nvidia Quadro. According to Dell, the alignment of these new technologies makes it one of its most significant workstation releases in a while.

While Intel won’t officially reveal details of its new Haswell-based Xeon E5-2600 v3 CPU family until September we expect there to be a significant rise in the number CPU cores, a step up from the maximum 12 cores that came with the Ivy Bridge-based Xeon E5-2600 v2.

Read more…

Add comment (0 comments)

AMD unveils new FirePro GPUs and seeks professional CAD apps for its Mantle graphics API

Published 12 August 2014

Posted by Greg Corke

Article tagged with: cad, amd firepro, opencl, gpu compute, opengl, directx, mantle

Today at Siggraph, AMD unveiled four new cards to complete its next generation family of professional FirePro GPUs based on the Graphics Core Next (GCN) architecture. The company also unveiled plans to push Mantle, its GCN-optimised graphics API, into the professional 3D space.

In terms of cards, the entry-level AMD FirePro W2100 and W4100, plus the mid-range AMD FirePro W5100 and W7100 join the high-end AMD FirePro W8100 and W9100 that were launched earlier this year. Prices have not yet been announced but should be in the same ball park as AMD’s previous generation FirePro GPUs we are told.

Read more…

View comments (3 comments)

Modo gets V-Ray rendering ability

Published 12 August 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: visualisation, modo, v-ray, viz, lighting, the foundry, vray, chaos group, shading

Vray integration is available for The Foundry’s products for the first time

In response to what The Foundry is billing as “artist and designer demands”, Chaos Group and The Foundry have announced that V-Ray will be available for a number of The Foundry’s creative software solutions.

Launching the new relationship at Siggraph, the two companies have developed V-Ray for Modo, Nuke and Katana, with the first pair available as a public beta online.

Built on V-Ray’s latest 3.0 core rendering technology, the integration with The Foundry’s tools streamlines the workflow for studios with pipelines already built around using V-Ray.

Read more…

Add comment (0 comments)

Design + Engineering Software Reviews - 2014 so far

Published 12 August 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: simulation, solidworks, design, 3d printing, autodesk, rendering, dassault systemes, ptc, visualisation, dassault systèmes

Check out our 2014 software reviews - including the latest updates to Autodesk Fusion 360

Here at DEVELOP3D we pride ourselves on our independent reviews - and boy do we cover a wide range of CAD, CAM, visualisation and even 3D printing software.

2014 has seen some great releases, and some interesting updates, so it’s probably a good time to catch up on what’s available now before the Autumn brings news of future releases.

Read more…

View comments (2 comments)

What’s new in Delcam PowerMILL 2015 - a CAM system for high-speed and five-axis machining

Published 11 August 2014

Posted by Tanya Weaver

Article tagged with: delcam, powermill, delcam powermill, five axis machining, powermill 2015

PowerMILL 2015 gives smoother toolpaths for machines with tilting tables

Delcam’s PowerMILL has developed into a CAM system that controls all manner of complex machine tools, from micromachining strategies for small parts to high-speed removal rates on large components.

Now, with the release of PowerMILL 2015, Delcam promises even faster machining of parts whilst maintaining superior part quality.

Big news for the 2015 release (check out Al Dean’s review of PowerMILL 2014 here) is improvements to the Vortex high-efficiency area-clearance strategy, improved collision checking to also cover near misses, and more efficient raster finishing.

Read more…

View comments (1 comment)

3D scan kiosk - GOM’s automated solution-in-a-box might have uses other than sprocket measuring

Published 11 August 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: autodesk, 3d scanning, 3d scanner, gom, museum, british museum, smithsonian, artefacts, scanbox

The ATOS ScanBox allows for highly detailed scanning with a simple interface

Automation in the everyday working world is a beautiful thing - let a robot take the strain while you put the kettle on and eat a Twix - but sometimes the technology could be used elsewhere.

3D scanning experts GOM introduced its ATOS ScanBox 4105 earlier this year, effectively a kiosk containing a compact, robot driven ATOS Core 3D scanner, with a turntable and inbuilt processing computer, used for automated measurement and inspection of small to medium parts and components.

The Virtual Measuring Room is the central control station and measurement planning software for all aspects of the process, removing the requirement for specific robot programming skills, meaning a simple and safe software interface most people can easily manage.

Read more…

Add comment (0 comments)

Swatch strips back time - 51 components, five modules, one hermetically sealed case

Published 11 August 2014

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: robots, wearable technology, watch design, watches, swiss, swatch

Reducing the usual 130-plus mechanical watch components, the Sistem51 has got that number down to a mere 51

Swatch has always been associated with fun wristwear design, but the Swiss watchmaker is also at the forefront of horological technology.

Its Sistem51 is the first mechanical movement ever to be on a fully-automated assembly line, throwing down 17 pending patents during its development, in less than two years, of a self-winding mechanical movement with only 51 components fitted into five modules.

When the average mechanical watch contains over 130 components, this reduction is allowed by making the case hermetically sealed, reducing friction and the need for maintenance.

Read more…

Add comment (0 comments)

Page 8 of 10 pages « First  <  6 7 8 9 10 >