Ford adopts Impossible Objects’s technology for composites R&D

Published 24 April 2018

Posted by Stephen Holmes

Article tagged with: 3d printing, manufacturing, manufacture, materials, ford, carbon fibre, impossible objects

Ford has purchased two of Impossible Objects’ Model One machines for its research and development teams, as it looks to enable complex composite parts manufacture at production speeds for the automotive industry.

Leveraging high-speed 2D graphics technologies, the Model One enables users to use a wide-range of composite and advanced materials, including carbon fiber, Kevlar and fiberglass together with PEEK and other high performance polymers, to automate lay-ups to build the strongest, lightweight parts at scale.

“We believe there’s huge opportunity for our technology across the $12 trillion global manufacturing market, and we’re honored to have Ford as a customer,” says Impossible Objects chairman and founder Bob Swartz. “We’re looking forward to working with Ford and exploring all the ways the company can use 3D printing at scale.”

The Ford announcement is the latest in a series of positive announcements for Impossible Objects in recent months, including raising $6.4 million in Series A funding in October 2017 and the adoption of its technology by Jabil, which bought a machine in the summer of 2017.

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